The use of indigenous microorganisms (IMO), fermented plant juice (FPJ), fish amino acid (FAA), oriental herbal nutrient (OHN) and lactic acid serum (LAS) on rice bran based broiler diets

by Ricardo C. Sumpay Jr. (completed May 2003)

ABSTRACT

      The study was conducted from December 20, 2002 to January 21, 2003 ut Jurnancire Poultry Farm, Bong., Pototan, Iloilo to evaluate the feeding value of indigenous microorganisms (IMO), fermented plant juice (FPJ), fish amino acid (FAA), oriental herbal nutrient (OHS), lactic acid serum (LAS) and their combined mixture on the growing, finishing, carcass quality arkl economic returns of arbor acre broilers on rice bran-hued diets. One hundred sixty-eight chicks were divided equally and assigned randomly into seven treatments with throe replications. The treatments were broiler diet A with commercial feed ration (It percent concoction level) and diets to, C, 0,10, F, and H with 1 percent coot of IMO, FPJ, FAA, 01-15, LAS and their combined mixture 00 rice bran-based broiler ration, respectively.
      The result of the study showed that broilers fed with commercial feed without concoction consumed more feeds and were relatively higher in liveweight gain, carcass recovered and returned over feed, chicks and medicine cost 05 compared with those fed with IMO, FPJ, 0115, combined mixture, FAA, and LAS. It wits only among broilers fed with oriental herbal where the commercial ration was significantly (P<0.01) comparable in the amount of feed consumed and liveweight gained.
      It was also observed that even if it is expensive to fed broilers on a purely commercial ration without concoction, a higher return over fed, medicine and chick cost was noted, as compared with those birds fed with IMO, FPJ, OHN, combined mixture, FAA, and LAS by P12.25, P14.22, P14.41, P15.87, P18.53, and P24.59 per bird on rice brand-based broiler ration, respectively.

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